Instytut Zdrowia Publicznego Wydział Nauk o Zdrowiu Uniwersytet Jagielloński Collegium Medicum Szczegółowy program i plan studiów stacjonarnych drugiego stopnia Zdrowie Publiczne


Governance of health sector (ścieżka III)



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Governance of health sector (ścieżka III)

Faculty

Faculty of Health Sciences

Unit conducting module

Health Policy and Management Policy

Course unit title

Governance of health sector

Course unit code




Language of instruction

English

Course objectives and learning outcomes

Knowledge:

1. student has the knowledge of public health policy creation and strategies implementation, as well as social and health policy at the local, European and global level

2. student knows the rules and conditionings of resources allocation at all levels of health care organization system - student acquires deepened knowledge of legal and economic aspects of the health sector functioning and of main stakeholders acting in the health sector (service providers, payer, the local and governmental authority and other bodies)

3. student knows the subject of inequalities in health and the various models of its explanatory


Skills:

4. students describes and discuss the main WHO strategies of health and implemented in selected European countries


Social competence:

5. student is engaged in public health promotion and in problems of social and health policy.



Type of course unit (compulsory/optional)

optional

Year of study (if applicable)

2

Semester

3

Teacher responsible

prof. dr hab. Włodzimierz Cezary Włodarczyk

dr Iwona Kowalska

dr Anna Mokrzycka

mgr Michał Zabdyr-Jamróz

dr Alicja Domagała


Name of examiner




Mode of delivery (face-to-face, distance learning)

lecture

practical classes



Prerequisites

knowledge of bacic concepts of health and social policy

Delivery length

practical classes: 30

Number of ECTS credits allocated

4

Estimation of the student workload needed in order to achieve expected learning outcomes

- seminar: 25 hours - 1 ECTS

- self-work: 75 hours - 3 ECTS



Teaching & learning methods

lecture, discussion, group work

Assessment methods and criteria;

course grading



group number 1 - science - test

group number 2 - skills - essay

group number 3 - social skills- case study


Form and conditions for the award of a credit

The assessment 2,0 - student doesn’t understand definition of good governance and is not able to use any example of the good governance idea in health care sector

The assessment - 3,0 student can provide a definition of good governance in health and a framework for thinking about governance issues as a way of improving performance in the health sector.

The assessment - 4,0 student can provide a definition of good governance in health and a framework for thinking about governance issues as a way of improving performance in the health sector using examples of budget and resource management, individual provider performance, health facility performance, informal payments, and corruption perception as well as decentralisation in health care, legal instruments etc.

The assessment - 5,0 student perform indicators that offer the potential for tracking relative health performance are proposed, and provide the context for the discussion of good governance in health service delivery in the areas of budget and resource management, individual provider performance, health facility performance, informal payments, corruption perceptions, decentralisation, new public management, law etc. Student can answer the question about effective solutions to advance good governance and performance in health on existing research and documented experiences



Course topics

Concept of governance, WHO, European Commission and leading governmental health national agencies, coordination models of health system, stewardship concept, centralization, decentralization and integration within health sector, national medical consulting, medical protocols and standards, information and reporting, nets of health facilities, waiting lists, people's voice, corruption in health sector

Recommended and required reading

        • USAID Health Governance: Concepts, Experience, and Programming Options, February 2008, http://www.healthsystems2020.org/content/resource/detail/1914/

        • UNDP and Governance: Experiences and Lessons learned, Management Development and Governance Division, Lessons-Learned Series No. 1, 16.06. 2006 http://www.pogar.org/publications/other/undp/governance/lessonslearned-e.pdf

        • COMMISSION OF THE EUROPEAN COMMUNITIES, EUROPEAN GOVERNANCE. A WHITE PAPER, COM(2001) 428 final, Brussels, 25.7.2001, http://ec.europa.eu/governance/index_en.htm

  • REGULATION (EC) No 1081/2006 OF THE EUROPEAN PARLIAMENT AND OF THE COUNCIL of 5 July 2006 on the European Social Fund and repealing Regulation (EC) No 1784/1999, http://eur-lex.europa.eu/LexUriServ/LexUriServ.do?uri=OJ:L:2006:210:0012:0018:EN:PDF

  • COUNCIL DECISION of 6 October 2006 on Community strategic guidelines on cohesion (2006/702/EC) http://slimak.onet.pl/_m/specjalne/fundusze/sww20072013_en2.pdf.

        • Kaufmann D., Kraay A., Mastruzzi M., Governance Matters VII: Aggregate and Individual Governance Indicators, 1996-2007, World Bank Policy Research Working Paper No. 4654, http://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=1148386

        • Anello E. (2008), A Framework for Good Governance in the Public Pharmaceutical Sector, Working draft for field testing and revision, WHO, Department of Essential Medicines and Pharmaceutical Policies, October 2008

        • Ritsatakis A. (2000), Learning from the past, looking to the future, Exploring health policy development in Europe, Edited by: Anna Ritsatakis, Ruth Barnes, Evert Dekker, Patsy Harrington, Simo Kokko, Peter Makara, WHO regional publications. European series; No. 86, WHO 2000, pp. 347-388

  • Wismar M., Lahtinen E., Stahl T., Ollila E., Leppo K. (2006), Introduction, Health in All Policies. Prospects and potentials, edited by Timo Stahl, Matthias Wismar, Eero Lahtinen, Eeva Ollila, Kimmo Leppo, Ministry of Social Afairs and Health, Finland, European Observatory on Health Systems and Policies

Duration, rules, and form of work placement(s)/internship, if envisaged by programme of study




Economic analysis of health care and public health programmes (ścieżka III)

Faculty

Faculty of Health Sciences

Unit conducting module

Health Economics and Social Security Department

Course unit title

Economic analyses of health care and public health programmes

Course unit code




Language of instruction

English

Course objectives and learning outcomes

Knowledge:

1. Student has an extensive knowledge on the types and methodology of economic analyses used in the health care sector

2. Student has an extensive knowledge on the costs assessment issue as well as measurement outcomes of the health care and public health programmes
Abilities:

3. Student is able to assess when the different types of economic analyses are appropriately used

4. Student is able to critically apprise economic evaluation studies in order to judge their relevance for health policy development

5. Student is able to plan and curry out a simple economic evaluation study for a specific population


Social competencies:

6. Student is able to search for objective sources of health outcomes and to obtain data for performing economic analysis

7. Student is able to motivate decision-makers to use generated in the health system data for health policy assessment


Type of course unit (compulsory/optional)

optional

Year of study (if applicable)

2

Semester

3

Teacher responsible

dr Katarzyna Kissimova-Skarbek

dr Katarzyna Dubas



Name of examiner




Mode of delivery (face-to-face, distance learning)

Lectures, case studies, computer laboratory

Prerequisites

Basic knowledge on health economics, mathematics and epidemiology

Delivery length

computer laboratory : 20


Number of ECTS credits allocated

3

Estimation of the student workload needed in order to achieve expected learning outcomes

- seminar: 20 hours - 1 ECTS

- self-work: 55 hours - 2 ECTS



Teaching & learning methods

lectures, case studies, seminars, practical exercises

Assessment methods and criteria;

course grading



Effect 1 - written examination

Effect 2 - practical case studies realization assessment

Effect 3 - written examination

Effect 4 -activity during the classess

Effect 5 - practical case studies realization assessment

Effect 6 - activity during the classes

Effect 7 - activity during the classes


Form and conditions for the award of a credit

The module will complete with a written examination whilst single classes will be credited based on the student presence, activity and ability to solve case studies during the classes and computer laboratory
Effect 1. Student has an extensive knowledge on the types and methodology of economic analyses used in the health care sector.

Mark fail (2,0): Student is not able to describe any of the main types of economic analyses used in the health care sector.

Mark fair (3,0): Student knows all main types of economic analyses used in the health care sector, however doesn’t know the methods and criteria of choosing the programmes.

Mark good (4,0): Student knows all main types of economic analyses used in the health care sector, and knows methods and criteria of selecting the best programmes, but can’t interpret the results.

Mark very good (5,0): Student has an extensive knowledge on the types and methodology of economic analyses used in the health care sector, knows the criteria of selecting the best programmes and how to interpret the results.
Effect 2: Student has an extensive knowledge on the costs assessment issue as well as measurement outcomes of the health care and public health programmes

Mark fail (2,0): Student doesn’t know approaches of costs measurement and units of measurement outcomes of the health care and health programmes.

Mark fair (3,0): Student knows approaches of costs measurement and measurement of health care and health programmes outcomes, but is not able to perform costs and outcomes measurements within the case studies.

Mark good (4,0): Student knows approaches of costs measurement and measurement of health care and health programmes outcomes, is able to perform costs and outcomes measurements within the case studies, but incorrectly interprets the results.

Mark very good (5,0): Student has an extensive knowledge on costs measurement and measurement of health care and health programmes outcomes, is able to perform costs and outcomes measurements within the case studies, and correctly interprets the results.
Effect 3. Student is able to assess when the different types of economic analyses are appropriately used.

Mark fail (2,0): Student is not able to assess when the different types of economic analyses are appropriately used.

Mark fair (3,0): Student is able to assess correctly when the economic analyses are correctly used (at least for three of the economic analyses types), and is not able to assess if the results are properly interpreted.

Mark good (4,0): Student is able to assess when the economic analyses are appropriately used (for all types of analyses), but is not able to assess if the results are correctly interpreted.

Mark very good (5,0): Student is able to assess when different types of economic analyses are appropriately used, and is able to assess if the results are correctly interpreted.
Effect 4. Student is able to critically appraise economic evaluation studies in order to judge their relevance for health policy development.

Mark fail (2,0): Student is not able to critically appraise economic evaluation studies and their relevance for health policy development

Mark fair (3,0): Student is able partially to perform critical appraisal of published studies according to the guidelines.

Mark good (4,0): Student is able to complete critical appraisal of published studies according to the guidelines, but is not able independently to assess their relevance for health policy development.

Mark very good (5,0): Student is able to critically appraise published studies according to the guidelines, and is able comprehensively to assess their relevance for health policy development.
Effect 5. Student is able to plan and curry out a simple economic evaluation study for a specific population.

Mark fail (2,0): Student is not able independently to plann and perform a simple economic evaluation study.

Mark fair (3,0): Student is able independently to plann a simple economic evaluation study, but not the all stages of analyses are correctyly performed.

Mark good (4,0): Student is able to plan and perform independently a simple economic evaluation study, but is not able to interpret correctly the results.

Mark very good (5,0): Student is able to plan and perform independently a simple economic evaluation study, to interpret correctly the results and to formulate propositions for action.
Effect 6. Student is able to search for objective sources of health outcomes and to obtain data for performing economic analysis.

Mark fail (2,0): Student is not able independently to find data from the objective sources in order to perform economic analysis.

Mark fair (3,0): Student is able independently to find proper sources of health outcomes but not able correctly to use this data in economic analysis.

Mark good (4,0): Student is able independently to find proper sources of health outcomes and partially correctly to use this data in economic analysis.

Mark very good (5,0): Student is able independently to find proper sources of health outcomes, correctly to use this data in economic analysis and to interpret the results.
Effect 7. Student is able to motivate decision-makers to use generated in the health system data for health policy assessment.

Mark fail (2,0): Student is not able to formulate key messages to decision-makers on necessity of using data generated in the health system for health policy assessment.

Mark fair (3,0): Student is able to formulate message for using data generated in the health system for health policy assessment, but not able to show arguments and properly explain them.

Mark good (4,0): Student is able to formulate key messages for using data generated in the health system for health policy assessment, can show arguments, but not able to explain them properly.

Mark very good (5,0): Student is able to formulate key messages for using data generated in the health system for health policy assessment, creates economic arguments , and is able to explain them properly.


Course topics

The educational module content will include the following topics:

- Costs of health care programmes - types of costs, costing methods, adjustment for timing, comparability of cost studies across countries and years of their realisation

- Types of economic analyses: Cost-minimisation analysis (CMA); Effect-maximisation analysis (EMA), Cost-benefit analysis (CBA); Cost-effectiveness analysis (CEA); Cost-utility analysis (CUA); Budget impact analysis (BIA)

- Methods and units of measurement outcomes of the health care programmes- Stages in the economic analysis

- Data sources. Decision analytic modeling (decision tree, Markov model)

- Using economic evaluation studies in the planning and management process within the health care sector

- Preparing economic evaluation - case studies


Recommended and required reading

  • Drummond M.F., Sculpher M.J., Torrance G.W., O'Brien B.J., Stoddart G.L. (2005), Methods for the economic evaluation of health care programmes, Third edition, Oxford University Press, Oxford

  • Gold M.R., Siegel J.E., Russell L.B., Weinstein M.C. (1996), Cost-effectiveness in health and medicine, Oxford University Press, New York

  • Netten A., Beecham J. (1993), Costing Community care. Theory and practice, PSSRU, University of Kent

  • Morris S., Devlin N., Parkin D.(2007), Economic Analysis in Health Care, John Willey & Sons, Chichester



  • Murray, C.J.L. ,Lopez A. (1996), The global burden of disease. v1, chapter 1, Published by World Health Organisation, Harvard School of Public Health and World Bank.

Duration, rules, and form of work placement(s)/internship, if envisaged by programme of study




Economic burden of diseases (ścieżka III)

Faculty

Faculty of Health Sciences

Unit conducting module

Department of Epidemiology and Population Studies, Health Economics and Social Security Department

Course unit title

Economic burden of diseases

Course unit code




Language of instruction

English

Course objectives and learning outcomes

Knowledge:

1. Has knowledge about the fundamental concepts that describe the health of the population

2. Knows the methods of the preliminary assessment of population health risks and disease prevalence
Skills:

3. Has ability to use theoretical knowledge, perception, observation and interpretation of phenomena in the field of population health

4. Can take advantage of available databases in order to clarify the factors affecting health


Type of course unit (compulsory/optional)

optional

Year of study (if applicable)

2

Semester

3

Teacher responsible

dr med. Roman Topór-Mądry

dr Katarzyna Kissimova-Skarbek



Name of examiner




Mode of delivery (face-to-face, distance learning)

practical classes

Prerequisites

knowledge of epidemiology, biostatistics and pharmacoeconomics

Delivery length

practical classes: 25

Number of ECTS credits allocated

3

Estimation of the student workload needed in order to achieve expected learning outcomes

- participation: 25 hours - 1 ECTS

- tests after class: 15 - 0,5 ECTS

- project and presentation: 45 hours - 1,5 ECTS


Teaching & learning methods

seminars, design and presentation

Assessment methods and criteria;

course grading



project and its presentation

Form and conditions for the award of a credit

Every student is obliged to create a project and prepare and present one final mini-lecture of 10 minute. The mini-lecture will be related to the topic of the course. Form of this final mini-lecture (more details at the bottom of the document): Oral presentation with Power Point - max 10 minutes

The length of the project (in MS Word or PDF) – 20 pages.

Integration of the presentation transcript within the Slide Show is acceptable (though not recommended) - in such case please use the "Lecturers' notices" option in Power Point.

Both electronic form (file) and print-out have to be handed over three days before evaluation (planned for 30 January 2014).

After the lecture the author should conduct 5 min discussion.

Maximum score for this final mini-lecture by lecturers’ assessment: 20 points.

Maximum score for the paper essay: 30 points.

The maximum of all collectable points is 50.

Points collected by course participants will be the basis for final score:

Sum of the points collected

0 – 24 fail (2,0)

25-29 fair (3,0)

30-34 plus fair (3,5)

35-39 good (4,0)

40-44 plus good (4,5)

45-50 very good (5,0)



Course topics

Definitions and overview of social and health problems connected with chronic diseases.

Issues: Heart diseases and cancer, smoking, physical activity, obesity.

Quality of life in chronic diseases (HALE, QUALY, DALY etc.).

Economic consequences of chronic diseases.

Burden of diabetes.

Costs of disease and its prevention.



Social determinants of chronic diseases.

Recommended and required reading

  • Lopez A.D. (1994), Global burden of disease and risk factors, Disease Control Priorities Project - Confronting the Epidemic of Chronic Disease, Oxford Health Alliance, http://www.oxha.org/

  • WHO National burden of disease studies: a practical guide http://www.who.int/healthinfo/nationalburdenofdiseasemanual.pdf

  • Sassi F., Hurst J., The prevention of livestyle-related chronic diseases DELSA/HEA/WD/HWP(2008)2; OECD HEALTH WORKING PAPERS

  • Global Alliance for Chronic Disease http://www.gafcd.org/

  • WHO Chronic diseases and health promotion http://www.who.int/chp/en/

  • The SuRF Report 2: Surveillance of chronic disease Risk Factors; WHO 2007

  • Major and Chronic Diseases, Eucopean Commision, Directorate-General for Health and Consumers 2007; http://ec.europa.eu/health/ph_threats/non_com/other_diseases_en.htm

  • Preventing Chronic Disease Vols. 1 to 6; 2004 to 2009; http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/journals/245/

  • The Tabacco Atlas http://www.tobaccoatlas.org/downloads/TobaccoAtlas.pdf

  • Chronic diseases: an economic perspective Oxford Health Alliance, http://www.oxha.org/

  • Jönsson B. (1998), The economic impact of diabetes, Diabetes care, 21 Supplement 3, C7-C-10;

  • International Diabetes Federation, Diabetes Atlas, Second Edition, 2003 http://www.eatlas.idf.org/About_e_Atlas/

  • Preventing chronic diseases: a vital investment WHO, 2005 http://www.who.int/chp/chronic_disease_report/en/

  • Chronic diseases managament and remote patient monitoring: Eurohealth Vol 1. 2009

  • 2008-2013 Action Plan for the Global Strategyfor the Prevention and Control of Noncommunicable Diseases, WHO

Duration, rules, and form of work placement(s)/internship, if envisaged by programme of study






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